#2 - Cecilia Granara - Painter cover
#2 - Cecilia Granara - Painter cover
The Talking Canvas Podcast

#2 - Cecilia Granara - Painter

#2 - Cecilia Granara - Painter

47min |02/05/2020
Listen
#2 - Cecilia Granara - Painter cover
#2 - Cecilia Granara - Painter cover
The Talking Canvas Podcast

#2 - Cecilia Granara - Painter

#2 - Cecilia Granara - Painter

47min |02/05/2020
Listen

Description

As a woman 

I know the difference between

appreciation

and 

teeth

what really hurts 

is that as a girl 

i had to know the same thing. 

—survivor 

Nayyirah Waheed


For this second episode, I interviewed Cecilia Granara, professional artist and fellow Italian that has made of Paris her home. 

When I first saw Cecilia’s paintings, an exuberant mix of bright colourful bodies, often naked and stylized, I thought she was bold and outspoken. 

As I talked with her, it became clear her practice was greatly influenced by an uncompromising academic research and endless feminist readings. 

So, take out your notebooks because this episode is packed with references and reading tips you might want to save. 

With Cecilia, we talked about the importance to depict women through a broader palette than what usually codified by the male gaze, how a very personal experience may morph into a collective one and why being disgraceful can actually lead to empowerment. 


Cecilia on Instagram: Cecilia Granara

Cecilia's work available at Non Cancelled Art online exhibition

Cecilia's picture by Michele Yong


REFERENCES:  

Mona Chollet, Sorcières, 2019

Linda Nochlin, Why there have not been great women artists?, 1971

Griselda Pollock

Sarah Ahmed, The cultural politics of emotion, 2004

Chris Kraus

Maggie Nelson, « Bluets » and «  The argonauts », 2009, 2015

Trin T Min Ha, Woman other native, 1989 

Theresa Hak Yung Cha, Dictée, 1996

Claudia Rankine, Don’t let me be lonely, 2004

Louis Fratino

Ridley Howard’s Instagram account 

Jenna Gribbon’s Instagram account 

John Berger, Ways of seeing, 1972

Liv Strômquist, L’origine du monde, 2016

Nancy Spero

Dana Schutz, How We Would Give Birth, 2007 


The Talking Canvas Podcast on Instagram 

The Talking Canvas Podcast on Facebook

Reach out at thetalkingcanvaspodcast@gmail.com

Description

As a woman 

I know the difference between

appreciation

and 

teeth

what really hurts 

is that as a girl 

i had to know the same thing. 

—survivor 

Nayyirah Waheed


For this second episode, I interviewed Cecilia Granara, professional artist and fellow Italian that has made of Paris her home. 

When I first saw Cecilia’s paintings, an exuberant mix of bright colourful bodies, often naked and stylized, I thought she was bold and outspoken. 

As I talked with her, it became clear her practice was greatly influenced by an uncompromising academic research and endless feminist readings. 

So, take out your notebooks because this episode is packed with references and reading tips you might want to save. 

With Cecilia, we talked about the importance to depict women through a broader palette than what usually codified by the male gaze, how a very personal experience may morph into a collective one and why being disgraceful can actually lead to empowerment. 


Cecilia on Instagram: Cecilia Granara

Cecilia's work available at Non Cancelled Art online exhibition

Cecilia's picture by Michele Yong


REFERENCES:  

Mona Chollet, Sorcières, 2019

Linda Nochlin, Why there have not been great women artists?, 1971

Griselda Pollock

Sarah Ahmed, The cultural politics of emotion, 2004

Chris Kraus

Maggie Nelson, « Bluets » and «  The argonauts », 2009, 2015

Trin T Min Ha, Woman other native, 1989 

Theresa Hak Yung Cha, Dictée, 1996

Claudia Rankine, Don’t let me be lonely, 2004

Louis Fratino

Ridley Howard’s Instagram account 

Jenna Gribbon’s Instagram account 

John Berger, Ways of seeing, 1972

Liv Strômquist, L’origine du monde, 2016

Nancy Spero

Dana Schutz, How We Would Give Birth, 2007 


The Talking Canvas Podcast on Instagram 

The Talking Canvas Podcast on Facebook

Reach out at thetalkingcanvaspodcast@gmail.com

Share

Embed

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Description

As a woman 

I know the difference between

appreciation

and 

teeth

what really hurts 

is that as a girl 

i had to know the same thing. 

—survivor 

Nayyirah Waheed


For this second episode, I interviewed Cecilia Granara, professional artist and fellow Italian that has made of Paris her home. 

When I first saw Cecilia’s paintings, an exuberant mix of bright colourful bodies, often naked and stylized, I thought she was bold and outspoken. 

As I talked with her, it became clear her practice was greatly influenced by an uncompromising academic research and endless feminist readings. 

So, take out your notebooks because this episode is packed with references and reading tips you might want to save. 

With Cecilia, we talked about the importance to depict women through a broader palette than what usually codified by the male gaze, how a very personal experience may morph into a collective one and why being disgraceful can actually lead to empowerment. 


Cecilia on Instagram: Cecilia Granara

Cecilia's work available at Non Cancelled Art online exhibition

Cecilia's picture by Michele Yong


REFERENCES:  

Mona Chollet, Sorcières, 2019

Linda Nochlin, Why there have not been great women artists?, 1971

Griselda Pollock

Sarah Ahmed, The cultural politics of emotion, 2004

Chris Kraus

Maggie Nelson, « Bluets » and «  The argonauts », 2009, 2015

Trin T Min Ha, Woman other native, 1989 

Theresa Hak Yung Cha, Dictée, 1996

Claudia Rankine, Don’t let me be lonely, 2004

Louis Fratino

Ridley Howard’s Instagram account 

Jenna Gribbon’s Instagram account 

John Berger, Ways of seeing, 1972

Liv Strômquist, L’origine du monde, 2016

Nancy Spero

Dana Schutz, How We Would Give Birth, 2007 


The Talking Canvas Podcast on Instagram 

The Talking Canvas Podcast on Facebook

Reach out at thetalkingcanvaspodcast@gmail.com

Description

As a woman 

I know the difference between

appreciation

and 

teeth

what really hurts 

is that as a girl 

i had to know the same thing. 

—survivor 

Nayyirah Waheed


For this second episode, I interviewed Cecilia Granara, professional artist and fellow Italian that has made of Paris her home. 

When I first saw Cecilia’s paintings, an exuberant mix of bright colourful bodies, often naked and stylized, I thought she was bold and outspoken. 

As I talked with her, it became clear her practice was greatly influenced by an uncompromising academic research and endless feminist readings. 

So, take out your notebooks because this episode is packed with references and reading tips you might want to save. 

With Cecilia, we talked about the importance to depict women through a broader palette than what usually codified by the male gaze, how a very personal experience may morph into a collective one and why being disgraceful can actually lead to empowerment. 


Cecilia on Instagram: Cecilia Granara

Cecilia's work available at Non Cancelled Art online exhibition

Cecilia's picture by Michele Yong


REFERENCES:  

Mona Chollet, Sorcières, 2019

Linda Nochlin, Why there have not been great women artists?, 1971

Griselda Pollock

Sarah Ahmed, The cultural politics of emotion, 2004

Chris Kraus

Maggie Nelson, « Bluets » and «  The argonauts », 2009, 2015

Trin T Min Ha, Woman other native, 1989 

Theresa Hak Yung Cha, Dictée, 1996

Claudia Rankine, Don’t let me be lonely, 2004

Louis Fratino

Ridley Howard’s Instagram account 

Jenna Gribbon’s Instagram account 

John Berger, Ways of seeing, 1972

Liv Strômquist, L’origine du monde, 2016

Nancy Spero

Dana Schutz, How We Would Give Birth, 2007 


The Talking Canvas Podcast on Instagram 

The Talking Canvas Podcast on Facebook

Reach out at thetalkingcanvaspodcast@gmail.com

Share

Embed

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