[Extract] "an Egregious Waste of Money?! No, a Beautiful Use of Resources!" - Colin Goddard - Source Global cover
[Extract] "an Egregious Waste of Money?! No, a Beautiful Use of Resources!" - Colin Goddard - Source Global cover
(don't) Waste Water!

[Extract] "an Egregious Waste of Money?! No, a Beautiful Use of Resources!" - Colin Goddard - Source Global

[Extract] "an Egregious Waste of Money?! No, a Beautiful Use of Resources!" - Colin Goddard - Source Global

59sec |21/09/2022
Play
[Extract] "an Egregious Waste of Money?! No, a Beautiful Use of Resources!" - Colin Goddard - Source Global cover
[Extract] "an Egregious Waste of Money?! No, a Beautiful Use of Resources!" - Colin Goddard - Source Global cover
(don't) Waste Water!

[Extract] "an Egregious Waste of Money?! No, a Beautiful Use of Resources!" - Colin Goddard - Source Global

[Extract] "an Egregious Waste of Money?! No, a Beautiful Use of Resources!" - Colin Goddard - Source Global

59sec |21/09/2022
Play

Description

Colin Goddard is Director at Source Global. Source aims to market the world's first renewable drinking water system.

Clean, safe, made entirely off-grid, and available almost anywhere in the world.


44 million. That's the unbelievable number I dug out and triple-checked after discussing with Colin. In the United States, 44 million people are served by water systems that recently had health-based Safe-Drinking Water Act violations, as the Dig Deep non-profit reveals. 


On top of these almost 15% of Americans that may have trust issues with their tap water, more than 2 million US-Citizens live without basic access to safe drinking water and sanitation.


So what's the way forward? There's, of course, more than just one option. When the Biden administration introduces a $111 billion investment to revamp the country's water infrastructure, that should concur to solve the problem.


But realistically, as strong as the reinforced tree trunk may become, it will remain tricky and almost impossible to fully reach the tip of every branch. So alternatives will come into play. The conventional alternatives are well-known, such as trucked water and bottled water, which alone will surpass utility water in investment worldwide by 2034, this year in the US, and already did, for instance, in Mexico.


And then, there might also be new types of alternatives, such as Source and its water produced from ambient moisture, but that Colin insists I don't call atmospheric water generation - he'll explain why in a minute. 


Created by Cody Friesen in 2015 and backed by no less than Bill Gates, Jeff Bezos, or Jack Ma, Source usually doesn't leave anyone indifferent in the water industry.


Some are very vocal about how much they doubt this approach, while others regularly endorse the company's accomplishments! Which side will you be on? I'll let you decide after you hear Colin out.


But for sure, if you have a strong opinion to share on that topic, my direct messages are widely open, or you can reach out at antoine at dww dot show. I'm really curious about it! 


Then, regardless of your thoughts on the matter, let me remind you that if you like what you hear, you can help me tremendously by sharing that content around you. 


Please tell your friends, colleagues, or LinkedIn network what you found inspiring in what Colin shares today, and if you don't like what you hear, please reach out to me and tell me what I should be doing differently or better. Come on, do it, and I'll meet you on the other side. 


Expensive, Heavy but Desperately Needed: is Source the Drinking Water of Tomorrow?

Description

Colin Goddard is Director at Source Global. Source aims to market the world's first renewable drinking water system.

Clean, safe, made entirely off-grid, and available almost anywhere in the world.


44 million. That's the unbelievable number I dug out and triple-checked after discussing with Colin. In the United States, 44 million people are served by water systems that recently had health-based Safe-Drinking Water Act violations, as the Dig Deep non-profit reveals. 


On top of these almost 15% of Americans that may have trust issues with their tap water, more than 2 million US-Citizens live without basic access to safe drinking water and sanitation.


So what's the way forward? There's, of course, more than just one option. When the Biden administration introduces a $111 billion investment to revamp the country's water infrastructure, that should concur to solve the problem.


But realistically, as strong as the reinforced tree trunk may become, it will remain tricky and almost impossible to fully reach the tip of every branch. So alternatives will come into play. The conventional alternatives are well-known, such as trucked water and bottled water, which alone will surpass utility water in investment worldwide by 2034, this year in the US, and already did, for instance, in Mexico.


And then, there might also be new types of alternatives, such as Source and its water produced from ambient moisture, but that Colin insists I don't call atmospheric water generation - he'll explain why in a minute. 


Created by Cody Friesen in 2015 and backed by no less than Bill Gates, Jeff Bezos, or Jack Ma, Source usually doesn't leave anyone indifferent in the water industry.


Some are very vocal about how much they doubt this approach, while others regularly endorse the company's accomplishments! Which side will you be on? I'll let you decide after you hear Colin out.


But for sure, if you have a strong opinion to share on that topic, my direct messages are widely open, or you can reach out at antoine at dww dot show. I'm really curious about it! 


Then, regardless of your thoughts on the matter, let me remind you that if you like what you hear, you can help me tremendously by sharing that content around you. 


Please tell your friends, colleagues, or LinkedIn network what you found inspiring in what Colin shares today, and if you don't like what you hear, please reach out to me and tell me what I should be doing differently or better. Come on, do it, and I'll meet you on the other side. 


Expensive, Heavy but Desperately Needed: is Source the Drinking Water of Tomorrow?

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Description

Colin Goddard is Director at Source Global. Source aims to market the world's first renewable drinking water system.

Clean, safe, made entirely off-grid, and available almost anywhere in the world.


44 million. That's the unbelievable number I dug out and triple-checked after discussing with Colin. In the United States, 44 million people are served by water systems that recently had health-based Safe-Drinking Water Act violations, as the Dig Deep non-profit reveals. 


On top of these almost 15% of Americans that may have trust issues with their tap water, more than 2 million US-Citizens live without basic access to safe drinking water and sanitation.


So what's the way forward? There's, of course, more than just one option. When the Biden administration introduces a $111 billion investment to revamp the country's water infrastructure, that should concur to solve the problem.


But realistically, as strong as the reinforced tree trunk may become, it will remain tricky and almost impossible to fully reach the tip of every branch. So alternatives will come into play. The conventional alternatives are well-known, such as trucked water and bottled water, which alone will surpass utility water in investment worldwide by 2034, this year in the US, and already did, for instance, in Mexico.


And then, there might also be new types of alternatives, such as Source and its water produced from ambient moisture, but that Colin insists I don't call atmospheric water generation - he'll explain why in a minute. 


Created by Cody Friesen in 2015 and backed by no less than Bill Gates, Jeff Bezos, or Jack Ma, Source usually doesn't leave anyone indifferent in the water industry.


Some are very vocal about how much they doubt this approach, while others regularly endorse the company's accomplishments! Which side will you be on? I'll let you decide after you hear Colin out.


But for sure, if you have a strong opinion to share on that topic, my direct messages are widely open, or you can reach out at antoine at dww dot show. I'm really curious about it! 


Then, regardless of your thoughts on the matter, let me remind you that if you like what you hear, you can help me tremendously by sharing that content around you. 


Please tell your friends, colleagues, or LinkedIn network what you found inspiring in what Colin shares today, and if you don't like what you hear, please reach out to me and tell me what I should be doing differently or better. Come on, do it, and I'll meet you on the other side. 


Expensive, Heavy but Desperately Needed: is Source the Drinking Water of Tomorrow?

Description

Colin Goddard is Director at Source Global. Source aims to market the world's first renewable drinking water system.

Clean, safe, made entirely off-grid, and available almost anywhere in the world.


44 million. That's the unbelievable number I dug out and triple-checked after discussing with Colin. In the United States, 44 million people are served by water systems that recently had health-based Safe-Drinking Water Act violations, as the Dig Deep non-profit reveals. 


On top of these almost 15% of Americans that may have trust issues with their tap water, more than 2 million US-Citizens live without basic access to safe drinking water and sanitation.


So what's the way forward? There's, of course, more than just one option. When the Biden administration introduces a $111 billion investment to revamp the country's water infrastructure, that should concur to solve the problem.


But realistically, as strong as the reinforced tree trunk may become, it will remain tricky and almost impossible to fully reach the tip of every branch. So alternatives will come into play. The conventional alternatives are well-known, such as trucked water and bottled water, which alone will surpass utility water in investment worldwide by 2034, this year in the US, and already did, for instance, in Mexico.


And then, there might also be new types of alternatives, such as Source and its water produced from ambient moisture, but that Colin insists I don't call atmospheric water generation - he'll explain why in a minute. 


Created by Cody Friesen in 2015 and backed by no less than Bill Gates, Jeff Bezos, or Jack Ma, Source usually doesn't leave anyone indifferent in the water industry.


Some are very vocal about how much they doubt this approach, while others regularly endorse the company's accomplishments! Which side will you be on? I'll let you decide after you hear Colin out.


But for sure, if you have a strong opinion to share on that topic, my direct messages are widely open, or you can reach out at antoine at dww dot show. I'm really curious about it! 


Then, regardless of your thoughts on the matter, let me remind you that if you like what you hear, you can help me tremendously by sharing that content around you. 


Please tell your friends, colleagues, or LinkedIn network what you found inspiring in what Colin shares today, and if you don't like what you hear, please reach out to me and tell me what I should be doing differently or better. Come on, do it, and I'll meet you on the other side. 


Expensive, Heavy but Desperately Needed: is Source the Drinking Water of Tomorrow?

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